Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Pinterest Connect on Google Plus Connect on YouTube

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection (MRSA)

Go to the full list of diseases

Disease Details

Transmission Type(s):

Disease Reservoirs

Disease Agents

About Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection (MRSA)

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacteria that is resistant to many antibiotics. In the community, most MRSA infections are skin infections. In medical facilities, MRSA causes life-threatening bloodstream infections, pneumonia and surgical site infections.

Anyone can get MRSA through direct contact with an infected wound or by sharing personal items, such as towels or razors, that have touched infected skin. MRSA infection risk can be increased when a person is in certain activities or places that involve crowding, skin-to-skin contact, and shared equipment or supplies. This might include athletes, daycare and school students, military personnel in barracks, and people who recently received inpatient medical care.

Studies show that about one in three people carry staph in their nose, usually without any illness. Two in 100 people carry MRSA. There are not data showing the total number of people who get MRSA skin infections in the community.

Symptoms

Often, people first think the area is a spider bite; however, unless a spider is actually seen, the irritation is likely not a spider bite. Most staph skin infections, including MRSA, appear as a bump or infected area on the skin that might be:

  • Red
  • Swollen
  • Painful
  • Warm to the touch
  • Full of pus or other drainage
  • Accompanied by a fever

Prevention

  • Cover your wounds. Keep wounds covered with clean, dry bandages until healed. Follow your doctor’s instructions about proper care of the wound. Pus from infected wounds can contain MRSA so keeping the infection covered will help prevent the spread to others. Bandages and tape can be thrown away with the regular trash.
  • Clean your hands often. You, your family, and others in close contact should wash their hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand rub, especially after changing the bandage or touching the infected wound.
  • Do not share personal items. Personal items include towels, washcloths, razors, clothing, and uniforms.
  • Wash used sheets, towels, and clothes with water and laundry detergent. Use a dryer to dry them completely.
  • Wash clothes according to manufacturer’s instructions on the label.

Read More

Read more about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection (MRSA) at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Website