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Chickenpox

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Disease Details

Incubation Period:

  • 14 - 21 days

Transmission Type(s):

Disease Agents

About Chickenpox

This child presented with the characteristic pancorporeal varicella, or “chickenpox” lesions. The blister-like lesions have a pus-filled center, appearing on the face, scalp, or trunk. Varicella is highly contagious, and spreads via coughing, or sneezing. Complications include bacterial infection of the skin, swelling of the brain, and pneumonia.

This child presented with the characteristic pancorporeal varicella, or “chickenpox” lesions.
The blister-like lesions have a pus-filled center, appearing on the face, scalp, or trunk. Varicella is highly contagious, and spreads via coughing, or sneezing. Complications include bacterial infection of the skin, swelling of the brain, and pneumonia.

Chickenpox is a very contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It causes a blister-like rash, itching, tiredness, and fever. Chickenpox can be serious, especially in babies, adults, and people with weakened immune systems. It spreads easily from infected people to others who have never had chickenpox or received the chickenpox vaccine. Chickenpox spreads in the air through coughing or sneezing. It can also be spread by touching or breathing in the virus particles that come from chickenpox blisters.

The best way to prevent chickenpox is to get the chickenpox vaccine. Before the vaccine, about 4 million people would get chickenpox each year in the United States. Also, about 10,600 people were hospitalized and 100 to 150 died each year as a result of chickenpox.

A person with chickenpox can spread the disease from 1 to 2 days before they get the rash until all their chickenpox blisters have formed scabs.

It takes from 10 to 21 days after exposure to a person with chickenpox or shingles for someone to develop chickenpox.

If a person vaccinated for chickenpox gets the disease, they can still spread it to others.

For most people, getting chickenpox once provides immunity for life. However, for a few people, they can get chickenpox more than once, although this is not common.

Read More

Read more about Chickenpox at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Website